Wyoming

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Home to the natural wonders of Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks, America’s least populated state is the cowboy west at its most beguiling.

In 1807 when John Colter, a member of the Lewis and Clark expedition, first wrote reports of shooting geysers, bubbling mudpots and steaming pools of water, he was widely ridiculed. Even today, with these marvels in front of your very eyes, there is something unbelievable about Yellowstone National Park. Add an abundance of large wild animals, such as bison, wolves and bears, into this otherworldly volcanic landscape and its easy to see why this corner of Wyoming is its most visited. Directly to the south lies the majestic mountains of Grand Teton and the well-heeled town of Jackson Hole.

Outside of its national parks you’ll get a feel for the real Wyoming. Huge wide open spaces, jagged mountain ranges, and grassy plains. If you look hard enough, you’ll still see the rutted wagon tracks of the trails that, only 150 years ago, brought early settlers to the frontier. The cowboy way of life is alive and well, with ranches, rodeos and weathered wranglers an integral part of any trip to Wyoming. Charming Western towns like Cody and Sheridan are linked by some of the most jaw-droppingly beautiful road trips in the country.

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